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Make 21st-Century Wonder Material Graphene Cheaply and Easily in the Classroom!

2016-06-06T14:37:25-06:00
03/14
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Chemical vapor deposition

Graphene is a two-dimensional material made from a single sheet of atoms, with outstanding mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. It is a promising candidate to enable next-generation technologies in a wide range of fields, including electronics, energy, and medicine. This economical, safe, and simple lab activity allows students to make graphene via chemical vapor deposition in 30–45 minutes in a classroom setting.

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Make 21st-Century Wonder Material Graphene Cheaply and Easily in the Classroom!2016-06-06T14:37:25-06:00

Superpowers of Liquid Crystals

2017-06-08T15:32:36-06:00
03/10
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Liquid crystal sensors

It's a solid . . . it's a liquid . . . it's a LIQUID CRYSTAL! Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Materials Research Science and Engineering Center are investigating how the unique properties of liquid crystals allow them to act as environmental sensors, detecting toxins in the environment. In this video, we give a brief overview of what liquid crystals are and how their properties can be utilized to improve the world.

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Superpowers of Liquid Crystals2017-06-08T15:32:36-06:00

Interacting with the World’s Universal Building Blocks

2017-07-06T13:26:22-06:00
08/04
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Free app

AtomTouch is a free, interactive molecular simulation app, created by researchers at the University of Wisconsin Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (UW MRSEC) to allow learners to explore principles of thermodynamics and molecular dynamics in an tactile, engaging way.

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Interacting with the World’s Universal Building Blocks2017-07-06T13:26:22-06:00

Molecular Light Switch

2016-02-23T15:31:16-06:00
02/23
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Just add water

A bit of stray moisture during an experiment tipped off scientists about the strange behavior of a complex oxide material they were studying—shedding light on its potential for improving chemical sensors, computing and information storage. In the presence of a water molecule on its surface, the layered material emits ultraviolet light from its interior.

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Molecular Light Switch2016-02-23T15:31:16-06:00

The Shape of the Future

2016-02-25T13:57:41-06:00
02/25
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Cubic or hexagonal?

There are many ways atoms can arrange microscopically to form crystalline materials. Interestingly, materials created from different arrangements of the same atoms may exhibit completely different physical and chemical properties. A method called thin film epitaxy allows scientists not only to fine-tune the properties of known materials, but also to generate completely new materials with structures and properties not found in nature.

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The Shape of the Future2016-02-25T13:57:41-06:00
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