MEET THE SCIENTISTS

A website is only as good as those who create it. Lucky for us, our contributors are globally renowned experts in their respective fields. Without further ado, we’d like to introduce you to our scientists!

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Founding Member

Shireen Adenwalla
Shireen Adenwalla enjoys most aspects of her job as a Professor of Physics at UNL.
Contributor
Karine Chesnel
Karine Chesnel is an Associate professor of Physics at BYU. She earned a MS in Physics from the Ecole Normale Superieure and a PhD in Physics from University Joseph Fourier in France. She completed a Post Doctoral Fellowship at the University of California Berkeley and was a visiting scientist at the High Magnetic Field CNRS laboratory in Toulouse, France, before joining the faculty at BYU.
Contributor
Michael Dickey
Michael Dickey received a BS in Chemical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology (1999) and a PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin (2006) under the guidance of Professor Grant Willson. From 2006-2008 he was a post-doctoral fellow in the lab of Professor George Whitesides at Harvard University. In August 2008, he joined the Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at NC State University where he is currently a Professor. Michael’s research interests include patterning and actuating soft materials by studying and harnessing thin films, interfaces, and unconventional fabrication techniques.

Founding Member

Peter Dowben
Peter Dowben is a Charles Bessey Professor of Physics at the University of Nebraska (UNL). He did a post-doctoral at the Fritz Haber Institute in Berlin, Germany under Professor Michael Grunze. He received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Cambridge, under the direction of Dr. Lionel Clarke. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a Fellow of the Institute of Physics and a Fellow of the American Vacuum Society. The focus of Peter Dowben’s group is on measuring the occupied and unoccupied electronic structure of molecules, surfaces and solids.

Founding Member

Axel Enders
Physicist at UNL.

Contributor

Stefan K Estreicher
PhD in theoretical Physics from the U of Zurich (1982), now Paul Whitfield Horn Professor of Physics at Texas Tech University; Fellow of the APS (1997); Humboldt Research Award (2001); Fellow of the Institute of Physics (2006). About 200 publications - including a handful on the history of wine. Research interests: first-principles theory of defects in semiconductors.
Contributor
AnneLynn Gillian-Daniel
Contributor
Sophia Hayes
Sophia is a professor of chemistry at Washington University in St. Louis. Dubbed a "chemicist" (in an accidental mis-translation by a German colleague), she has spent time as a postdoc at Technical Univ. of Dortmund (Germany), a postdoc in a chemical engineering department (jointly at UC Berkeley and LLNL), and was a graduate student at UCSB. She and her group delight in NMR spectroscopy, but have brought lasers into the lab, too, because why should the optics teams have all the fun? Hayes and her group work on optically-pumped NMR of semiconductors and spin orientation, but also on solid-state NMR studies of the structure of non-crystalline thin metal-oxide films, mesoporous materials for capture of carbon dioxide, and the structure of minerals.
Contributor
Xia Hong
Research interests: Complex oxide interfaces, 2D materials, scanning probe microscopy

Founding Member

Alexey Kovalev
I am a condensed matter physicist working on various theoretical problems in the field of spintronics.
Contributor
Daniel Lathrop
Daniel Lathrop is Professor of Physics at the University of Maryland and a Fellow of the American Physical Society. His research focuses on turbulent fluid flows, geomagnetism, and experiments on superfluid helium. Dr. Lathrop received a B.A. in Physics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1987, and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Texas at Austin in 1991. He served at Yale University as a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer, and as Assistant Professor at Emory University. He joined the University of Maryland in 1997, the year he received a Presidential Early Career Award from the NSF.

Founding Member

Chris Leighton
Chris Leighton is a Distinguished McKnight University Professor at the University of Minnesota, in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science. He works on the electronic and magnetic properties of a wide variety of materials.

Founding Member

Jeremy Levy
Jeremy Levy is a Distinguished Professor of condensed matter physics at the University of Pittsburgh and Director of the Pittsburgh Quantum Institute. He works on oxide materials, nanoelectronics, and quantum computation and simulation.

Founding Member

Pavel Lukashev
I received M.S. and Ph.D. in Physics from the Case Western Reserve University in 2003 and 2007 respectively. I received B.S. in Physics from the Yerevan State University in 1996. I worked as a postdoctoral research associate from 2006 to 2014 in University of Nebraska at Omaha and University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Since 2014, I am an Assistant Professor in the Physics Department at the University of Northern Iowa. My area of expertise is computational and theoretical condensed matter physics and materials science.

Founding Member

Vesna Mitrovic
Associate professor of physics at Brown University working on experimental study of the quantum properties of materials.

Contributor

Funsize Physics
Funsize Physics is a community of real live scientists dedicated to showcasing the wonder, beauty, and potential of cutting-edge materials research.
Contributor
Roberto Ramos
Roberto Ramos is Associate Professor of Physics and Director of Undergraduate Research at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. His research is on multi-gap superconductors, quantum computing, 2D helium physics, and physics pedagogy. He received his BS Physics degree from the University of the Philippines and his Physics Ph.D. from the University of Washington. After a quantum computing postdoc at the U of Maryland, he worked at Drexel University and was Blanchard Endowed Chair at Indiana Wesleyan University. He has been Director of two NSF S-STEM programs and received the Allan Rothwarf Award for Teaching Excellence at Drexel.

Founding Member

Leigh Smith
Leigh Smith is a Professor of Physics at the University of Cincinnati and uses laser light scattering to study the confined electronic and spin states in single nano structures. He received his PhD from the University of Illinois and his BA degree in Mathematics and Physics from the University of Virginia. He worked for two years at IBM Watson Research Center before joining the faculty at the University of Cincinnati.
Contributor
David Snoke
David Snoke (Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, A.B. Cornell University) is Professor of Physics at the University of Pittsburgh. He leads an experimental optics laboratory which studies basic quantum mechanical effects in semiconductors. He recently published an undergraduate textbook on electronics (Pearson, 2015) which integrates basic physics concepts with understanding electronic circuits.

Founding Member

Michael Stavola
Michael Stavola obtained his PhD under the supervision of Professor D.L. Dexter at the University of Rochester. He began his career at Bell Laboratories (1980-89) and then joined the Department of Physics at Lehigh University where he is presently the Sherman Fairchild Professor of Physics. Michael's research is focused on the spectroscopy of impurities in nonmetallic solids that are important in electronics technology.
Contributor
Chris Van de Walle
Chris G. Van de Walle is a Professor in the Materials Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the Herbert Kroemer Chair in Materials Science. Prior to joining UCSB he was a Principal Scientist at Xerox PARC (1991-2004). He is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the APS, the AVS, the AAAS, the MRS, and the IEEE, and the recipient of a Humboldt Award for Senior US Scientist, the 2002 David Adler Award from the APS, and the 2013 Medard W. Welch Award from the AVS.
Contributor
Andrey Vilesov
Andrey is a professor in the departments of Chemistry and Physics and Astronomy in the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. His research includes properties of superfluid helium nanodroplets and the characteristics of the atomic and molecular aggregates inside these droplets.

Founding Member

Greg Voth
I am a Professor of Physics at Wesleyan University. My research focuses on turbulent fluid flows using video imaging to measure 3D particle motion. Recently we have been using 3D printing to fabricate complex particle shapes and we find fascinating behavior like the chiral dipole shaped particles that choose a preferred direction to rotate in random isotropic turbulence.
Contributor
Bingqian Xu

Founding Member

Xiaoshan Xu
I am a condensed matter physicist who is interested in research on magnetoelectric properties in oxides and organic thin films.

Founding Member

Fengyuan Yang
Fengyuan Yang is a professor in the Department of Physics at the Ohio State University. He received his PhD from the Johns Hopkins University in 2001 and joined the faculty at Ohio State in 2003. His research interests include epitaxial growth of single crystalline films of complex materials and novel magnetic, spintronic, and topological phenomena in these materials.

Founding Member

Hui Zhao
Hui Zhao is an Associate Professor in Physics at University of Kansas. He obtained his Ph.D. from Beijing Jiaotong University in 2000. After postdoctoral research at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany) and University of Iowa, he joined the Department of Physics and Astronomy at University of Kansas in 2007. His expertise is on laser spectroscopy of semiconductors.